Allied Health Schools in New Mexico

New Mexico is a southwestern state. It holds the highest percentage of Hispanics and the second-highest percentage of Native Americans among states. It is a leading producer of oil and natural gas. Other important industries include tourism and federal agencies. Most of the state consists of mountains, high plains and deserts, with occasional basins and mesas. The climate is semi-arid to arid, with hot summers and moderate snowfall in winter.

Allied Health Schools

Allied health refers to the growing health care industry outside of physicians, nurses and dentists. Allied health specialists don’t have to go to medical school. Some of the many allied health professions include: clinical laboratory personnel, physical therapists, occupational therapists, dietitians, radiologists, speech therapist and respiratory therapists.

Allied health schools provide all the necessary training for a specific job for a fraction of the cost and time necessary for becoming a nurse, doctor or dentist. Training for some allied health positions can take as little as six months, though other positions require up to four years of training.

Here are two of the many positions available. All figures are from the latest U.S. Department of Labor statistics. The median salaries and hourly rates for 2010 are given in parentheses in the subtitles, followed by the projected job growth figures from 2010-2020.

Medical Assistant ($28,860, $13.87, +31%)

Medical assistants are probably the first and last faces you’ll see during a medical examination. These professionals perform a mixture of office jobs—like answering phones and manning the front desk—while also performing hands-on medical tasks like checking vital signs, drawing blood and sterilizing equipment. This position is highly in demand and boasts a much faster rate of growth than most jobs. This job can serve as a stepping stone to other careers in the health industry.

Massage Therapist ($34,900, $16.78, +20%)

Massage therapists treat patients by manipulating soft tissue and muscles to treat pain that can result from any number of issues. Massage has also proven beneficial in the rehabilitation of athletic injuries and in supporting overall good health. It demands physical strength, a sensitive touch and the capacity to establish a rapport with clients.

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